ALOPECIA AREATA AFFECTS
THE WHOLE PERSON

Alopecia areata is more than hair loss, causing a number of other symptoms. People living with alopecia areata shared their experiences in a survey that revealed that they face significant burdens from this disease, including a range of physical symptoms and significant psychosocial impacts. The survey results were published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings.1 Concert Pharmaceuticals provided funding to sponsor the research.

1 "Burden of Illness in Alopecia Areata: A Cross-Sectional Online Survey Study"

  • EYES, EYEBROWS, EYELASHES
  • SCALP
  • NOSE
  • NAILS
  • DEPRESSION + ANXIETY
  • NEGATIVE IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM

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PATIENT VOICES

  • SHANNON’S
    STORY

    “With all the advances in medicine today, I do believe that we are looking to a brighter future.”

    WATCH >

  • HEATHER’S
    STORY

    “It’s not a fashion choice, it’s alopecia areata.”

    READ MORE >

  • STEPHANIE’S
    STORY

    “It’s encouraging that so much research is on the horizon.”

    READ MORE >

A PHYSICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE

“Imagine inhabiting a body that you don’t recognize in the mirror. It sounds like science fiction, or maybe even a nightmare, but it’s real for many people with alopecia areata.”

FACTS
ABOUT Alopecia areata:

  • Affects up to approximately 1.5 million Americans at any given time
  • Affects both men and women
  • Can occur for the first time throughout life, with the majority of those affected initially having symptoms by age 40
  • Can affect any hair-bearing site – Hair loss can be on the scalp or other areas or both
  • Can be associated with anxiety and depression

UNDERSTANDING
ALOPECIA AREATA

Alopecia areata results in partial or complete loss of hair on the scalp and body, and it can have other symptoms as well.

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks some part of your own body.

According to the National Institutes of Health, with alopecia areata the immune system, which is designed to protect the body from foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, mistakenly attacks the hair follicles, the structures from which hairs grow.1

1 https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/alopecia-areata/advanced

 

WE BELIEVE EVERYONE
DESERVES CHOICE.

When you are ready to talk to a dermatologist about alopecia areata, you should be ready to discuss your symptoms and the severity of your disease.

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